Thursday, January 10, 2008

Seattle "Sounders" not to be

I’ve heard what is supposedly the final, decided-upon name for Seattle’s new MLS expansion team that begins play in 2009. If it’s true, it’s stupid. So stupid, in fact, that it makes Real Salt Lake seem inspired. I know the powers that be have this notion that “Seattle Sounders,” as historic and seemingly appropriate as it is to a lot of soccer fans and Seattleites, connotes “minor league soccer” (as the Sounders have been a USL team for the last 13 years). But this name, which will have half the people saying “Where do they play?” and the other half going “I’m supposed to cheer for that?” is just inane. Hopefully they’ll come to their senses before an announcement is made. Or, like Houston 1836, they’ll be forced to come to their senses after the fact.

Link:
http://kenn.com/blog/?p=195

2 comments:

Ryan said...

Your an idiot! Seattle is located on the "Puget Sound" and many great players have come through and donned the great name. How can it be a bad idea when we already have 15,000 deposits down for season tickets? It is a great name that reminds many people from the region of great times when soccer outsold the MLB in this town. In case you didn't know, in the 70's we averaged over 23,000 per game while being called the "Sounders." Learn your history before you spout such nonsense.

Ivan Mathew said...

As a long time Whitecaps supporter (the history between the Sounders and the Caps is probably stronger than any other clubs/cities in North America) I have to agree with Ryan. The Sounders is a logical extension of tradition, much like the San Jose Earthquakes. Teams (like Leeds United, Sheffield Wednesday, West Bromwich Albion) go up and down leagues in the UK, so I don't see how an old club's name denotes amateurism or professionalism, if anything it just strengthens tradition and reintroduces the history to a new generation. The only way were ever going to have clubs that mean anything in the USA and Canada is by keeping the same names.

Real Salt Lake however, there's nothing remotely Royal or Spanish about the urban sprawl that litters the landscape near the great Salt Lake.